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The recovering economy may make many brands think the painful digital shift they’ve been undergoing in their channels will subside as traditional retail, wholesale, outside, and catalog sales get a lift with a stronger economy. They'd be wrong. While a stronger economy will help all sales, this recovery will likely see its biggest boost in digital channels – everything from direct sales and drop ships to social commerce and Amazon domination. There's plenty for a brand to do in 2018, but here are 5 trends you should be acting on now.
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If you're a small business with a Facebook presence, it pays to keep abreast of what Facebook is up to in the ad department. The social media behemoth  regularly updates its product offering for small businesses. Some recent additions include:

• Graph Search: lets you query Facebook members' opinions on favorite restaurants and local businesses. Facebook says the tool can make it easier for people to discover your Facebook page and learn about your business.

• Promoted posts: Profit from your "likes" by creating ads that appear in the News Feeds of people and friends who have liked them. The cost is based on how many people an advertiser wants to reach, and promoted posts can be targeted via location, age and interests.

• Mobile app install ads: If you have you own app, Facebook offers a paid way to get customers to download the app via an ad that redirects consumers to the iPhone App Store or Google Play.

Not on Facebook? Not sure if you should be? Yeoman helps manufacturers and publishers of all sizes sort out the seven internet channels to develop a top-notch online channel strategy. Contact is to find out what we can do for you.

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Live State of Internet Report

There's a very slick and visually catchy report on "The State of the Internet" from the website onlineschools.org,  that covers all sorts of interesting Internet factoids, from the minutiae (152 MILLION blogs?!?) to the grand, including which countries consider Internet access an inalienable right, and which ones consider it threatening enough to severely limit access to their citizens.


It includes a counter showing you how many folks have visited the Internet for the first time since you started looking at the page, and one that shows the number of new websites created in the same time span. (Luckily there are still more new visitors than new websites.) It also includes a neat map of the race for social media domination. Hint: Facebook is currently winning - but guess who's giving it a run for the money?


Very interesting stuff.  And for those of you who still don't think your customers want to interact with you on the web, it may give you the inspiration to revisit that assumption. 


See the report for yourself here.



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We here at Yeoman are very interested in how customers and prospects interact with brands online. Inc. Magazine recently ran an article on 4 new services that promise to measure your brand's social media influence- and presumably influence you to make some important decisions on how much hard cash to spend on soft marketing initiatives. 

But can you really wrap numbers around activities designed to build brand awareness and consumer loyalty? Back when it was all "real-world" PR, sponsorships and the like, no one really bothered to try. Now that we can track and trace everything all over the web, we think we can (and should) build business cases for every moment of employee time that gets spent on brand awareness activities. The question is: are we getting smarter about measuring the results of social media or are we killing the goose just as it's laying the golden egg?

The answer, like your comany's Facebook status, is "it's complicated." Should you look beneath the surface and use some well understood metrics to see how effective your campaigns are? Absolutely. Should you let someone else slap some cookie cutter metrics on what those success factors are? Probably not.

To really measure your online influence, you need to look at all of your online efforts in a way that respects the way you do business: your products, your unique place in the market and the hearts and minds of your customers. Then set your own specific goals and measure how you're doing against them. Some interesting questions to answer include:

  • Do my customers and prospects actually use Twitter/Facebook/Linked In/etc?
  • Are the prospects I get from these sources worth getting? (hint: Google Analytics can help here)
  • Is there some real (albeit soft) value to my social media presence that I really just can't measure?

Our verdict is to be suspicious of any one-size fits all measurement approach that sticks your stats into an engine and spits out a one-dimensional response. Develop your own metrics for success, then figure out which methods best move the needle for you.


And get in touch with us if you want some help digging in.



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Do your customers and prospects actually “friend” “like” and “fan” business pages on Facebook? And if they do, how does that translate into sales?


Chadwick Martin Bailey recently conducted a survey to find out how consumers interact with brands on Facebook. Our top takeaways:

  • A lot of people actually spend time on Facebook: 52% of Americans spend at least one hour per week on Facebook
  • People don’t “like” brands indiscriminately: 78% of those who “like” a brand on Facebook like fewer than 10 brands. Also, 76% of people reported they have never “unliked” a brand, (and another 9% didn’t know if they had or not, so they probably hadn’t)
  • You DO need to offer a carrot: 57% of those who “like” a brand reported that they did it to get a discount or take advantage of a promotion
  • Facebook relationships make customers more loyal: 56% of “fans” are more likely to recommend a brand to a friend, and 51% say they are more likely to buy from a company again after becoming a fan


Read the whole graphic report: “10 Quick Facts Your Should Know About Consumer Behavior on Facebook.”

Wondering which (if any) social media outlets are good for your brand? Give us a shout – we’d love to talk to you about it.

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